Classroom Resources: Solutions


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1 – 18 of 18 Classroom Resources

  • Physical Properties, Solubility, Polarity, Covalent Bonding, Intermolecular Forces, Molecular Geometry, Electronegativity | High School, Middle School

    Activity: The Chemistry of Water Video Questions

    In this lesson, students will watch a video and answer questions about how the molecular geometry and polarity of water give rise to many of its unusual physical properties, including its relatively high boiling point and its ability to dissolve some substances but not others.

  • Physical Properties, Solubility, Melting Point, Naming Compounds, Molecular Formula, Ionic Bonding, Ionic Radius, Ions | High School

    Activity: My Name is Bond, Ionic Bond

    In this lesson, students will demonstrate their knowledge of ionic bond strength using a “brackets” activity. Pairs of students start the activity playing a game of “Ionic Compound War” to build eight compounds. Then then transfer the compounds to a “bracket” and use their knowledge of ionic bonding, along with a solubility chart, to predict the strongest and weakest bond between four pairs of ionic substances.

  • Physical Properties, Solubility, Melting Point, Naming Compounds, Molecular Formula, Ionic Bonding, Ionic Radius, Ions | High School

    Activity: Ionic Bonding Brackets

    In this lesson, students will demonstrate their knowledge of ionic bond strength and its relationship to the properties of melting point and solubility using a “brackets” activity. After analyzing the ionic charge and radius to predict the strongest and weakest bond between four pairs of ionic substances, they will then determine which will be the least soluble.

  • Mixtures, Molecular Structure, Electromagnetic Spectrum | High School, Middle School

    Activity: What are Pigments? Video Questions

    In this activity, students will watch a video and answer related questions about the chemistry of pigment molecules and how they are used to give paints their specific color. During the video, students will learn about the importance of a pigment’s molecular structure, how they are physically suspended to create a paint color, as well as how they interact with light.

  • Mixtures, Intermolecular Forces, Polymers, Molecular Structure, Solute & Solvent, Intermolecular Forces, Electromagnetic Spectrum | High School, Middle School

    Activity: What is Paint? Video Questions

    In this activity, students will watch a video and answer related questions about the composition of paint. During the video, students will learn about the differences between three common paint types, water colors, oil-based and acrylic paint as well as the chemistry of each.

  • Concentration, Solute & Solvent, Molarity | High School

    Simulation: Preparing Solutions

    In this simulation, students will complete a calculation in order to determine either the molarity of solution, volume of solution, or mass of solute needed. Additionally the associated particle diagram for the solution will be displayed to help students better visualize the solution at the particulate level. Finally, students will gain familiarity with the proper lab techniques for preparing a solution as they are lead through a step-by-step animated process demonstrating this procedure.

  • Balancing Equations, Activity Series, Classification of Reactions, Solubility Rules | High School

    Simulation: Predicting Products

    In this simulation, students will reference an activity series and a solubility chart to accurately predict the products of single replacement and double replacement chemical reactions. Associated particle diagrams will be displayed to help students better comprehend the reaction at the particulate level. Students will also be asked to balance the chemical equation. The simulation is designed as a five question quiz for students to use multiple times.

  • Concentration, Solute & Solvent, Molarity | High School

    Activity: Simulation Activity: Preparing Solutions

    In this simulation, students will complete a calculation in order to determine the value of an unknown variable related to a described solution and then they will observe an animation of the solution being prepared. The calculation will require the student to determine either the molarity of solution, volume of solution, or mass of solute needed. Additionally the associated particle diagram for the solution will be displayed to help students better visualize the solution at the particulate level. Finally, students will gain familiarity with the proper lab techniques for preparing a solution as they are lead through a step-by-step animated process demonstrating this procedure. The simulation is designed as a five question quiz for students to use multiple times.

  • Balancing Equations, Activity Series, Classification of Reactions, Solubility Rules | High School

    Activity: Simulation Activity: Predicting Products

    In this simulation, students will reference an activity series and a solubility chart to accurately predict the products of single replacement and double replacement chemical reactions. Associated particle diagrams will be displayed to help students better comprehend the reaction at the particulate level. Students will also be asked to balance the chemical equation. The simulation is designed as a five question quiz for students to use multiple times.

  • Solubility, Intermolecular Forces, Polarity, Covalent Bonding, Solute & Solvent, Intermolecular Forces | High School

    Activity: T-Shirt Chromatography

    In this activity, students will learn about solubility, saturation, polarity, and intermolecular forces through chromatography techniques.

  • Solubility, Solute & Solvent, Intermolecular Forces | High School, Middle School

    Activity: Advanced Modeling of the Dissolving Phenomenon

    In this activity students build a model of sodium chloride based on their own knowledge of ionic compounds. Then they construct a model of the interactions between water and their salt model to develop an understanding of what caused the salt to dissolve. After refining their models based upon class discussions and critiques, students then construct a model of the interaction between salt and a different solvent, alcohol. Using their models, students make predictions as to which solvent (water or alcohol) would be better at dissolving the salt. Finally students design an experiment to test their prediction. As an extension, students are asked to use their solubility models to explain why calcium carbonate will not dissolve in water, even though it is also an ionic compound.

  • Solubility, Solute & Solvent, Intermolecular Forces | High School, Middle School

    Activity: Basic Modeling of the Dissolving Phenomenon

    In this activity, students explore the process of salt dissolving in water using cut-outs of ions and water molecules to model interactions between them. They then use their model to make a prediction about the relative solubility of salt in isopropyl alcohol compared to the solubility in water and design an experiment to test their prediction.

  • Concentration, Molarity | High School

    Activity: Particle Level Molarity

    In this activity, students are introduced to molarity at the particle level. Students will activate their prior knowledge by demonstrating their understanding of concentration by preparing several Kool-Aid drinks, and then applying that information at the particle level to various models.

  • Mixtures, Molecular Structure, Electromagnetic Spectrum | High School, Middle School

    Video: What are Pigments? Video

    This video discusses the chemistry of pigment molecules and how they are used to give paints their specific color. Students will learn about the importance of a pigment’s molecular structure, how they are physically suspended to create a paint color, as well as how they interact with light.

  • Mixtures, Intermolecular Forces, Molecular Formula, Polymers, Molecular Structure, Solute & Solvent, Intermolecular Forces, Electromagnetic Spectrum | High School, Middle School

    Video: What is Paint? Video

    This video investigates the composition of paint, while analyzing the fundamental chemistry principles of its main components. Students will learn about the differences between three common paint types, water colors, oil-based and acrylic paint as well as the chemistry of each.

  • Mixtures, Solubility, Intermolecular Forces, Polarity, Solute & Solvent, Intermolecular Forces, Molecular Geometry | High School, Middle School, Elementary School

    Animation: Solubility Animation

    In an animation, students will have an opportunity to visualize on the particulate level how solubility works. Examples of ionic compounds and a polar covalent compound show how when water is attracted to charged parts, they dissolve, and when they're not attracted to charged parts they stay solid. **This video has no audio**

  • Precipitate, Balancing Equations, Solubility Rules | High School

    Animation: Net Ionic Equations Animation

    In this animation, students will witness a precipitate reaction on the particulate level to understand why a net ionic equation represents what happens in these reaction types. An example of diluting a soluble solid, mixing two aqueous reactants that yield aqueous products, and mixing two aqueous reactants that yield a precipitate are part of this animation. **This video has no audio**

  • Concentration, Solute & Solvent, Molarity, Stoichiometry, Mole Concept, Dimensional Analysis, Tyndall Effect | High School

    Activity: Solubility & Solutions

    In this inquiry activity, students investigate types of solutions, identifying the solute and solvent, and classifying each solution. They them solve stoichiometry problems involving solutions of different concentrations.

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Grade Level: High School

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