Classroom Resources: Molecules & Bonding


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1 – 7 of 7 Classroom Resources

  • Physical Properties, Covalent Bonding, Electronegativity, Polarity, Molecular Geometry, Intermolecular Forces, Solubility | Middle School, High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Activity: The Chemistry of Water Video Questions Mark as Favorite (40 Favorites)

    In this lesson, students will watch a video and answer questions about how the molecular geometry and polarity of water give rise to many of its unusual physical properties, including its relatively high boiling point and its ability to dissolve some substances but not others.

  • Molecular Structure, Molecular Geometry, Polymers, Electronegativity, Heat, Temperature, Electricity | Middle School, High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Activity: Future of Paint Video Questions Mark as Favorite (3 Favorites)

    In this activity, students will watch a video and answer related questions about the fascinating and innovative scientific advancements of paint. During the video, Students will learn how the molecular components in paint are helping to evolve in the world around them.

  • Molecular Structure, Molecular Geometry, Polymers, Electronegativity, Heat, Temperature, Electricity | Middle School, High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Video: The Future of Paint Video Mark as Favorite (17 Favorites)

    This video explores the fascinating and innovative scientific advancements of paint. Students will learn how the molecular components in paint are helping to evolve in the world around them. Futuristic paint is capable of replacing light switches, conducting electricity, and regulating temperature amongst other things!

  • Solubility, Solute & Solvent, Mixtures, Intermolecular Forces, Intermolecular Forces, Polarity, Molecular Geometry | Elementary School, Middle School, High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Animation: Solubility Animation Mark as Favorite (76 Favorites)

    This animation explores how ionic and molecular compounds dissolve (or don’t) in water. Students will see that if an ionic compound such as salt dissolves, the ions dissociate, whereas the molecules in a molecular compound such as sugar remain intact but are separated from one another by water molecules. They will also see that some ionic compounds such as chalk do not dissolve, and the cations and anions remain stuck together. **This video has no audio**

  • Molecular Structure, Molecular Geometry, History, Periodic Table, Molecular Structure | Elementary School, Middle School, High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Video: Phosphorous Video Mark as Favorite (9 Favorites)

    In this video, Sam Kean tells the story of how phosphorus was at the center of the race to discover the structure of DNA.

  • Molecular Formula, Ionic Bonding, Covalent Bonding, Molecular Geometry, Naming Compounds, Lewis Structures, Periodic Table, Valence Electrons, Lewis Dot Diagrams, Ions, Subatomic Particles | High School, Middle School

    Activity: Simulation Activity: Ionic and Covalent Bonding Mark as Favorite (109 Favorites)

    In this simulation, students investigate both ionic and covalent bonding. Students will have the opportunity to interact with many possible combinations of atoms and will be tasked with determining the type of bond and the number of atom needed to form each. The simulation visually differentiates between the transferring of electrons when forming an ionic compound and the sharing of electrons when forming a covalent compound so that students can have a complete understanding of each. Finally, students will become familiar with the molecular formula, as well as the naming system for each type of bond and geometric shape, when applicable.

  • Molecular Formula, Ionic Bonding, Covalent Bonding, Molecular Geometry, Naming Compounds, Lewis Structures, Periodic Table, Valence Electrons, Lewis Dot Diagrams, Ions, Subatomic Particles | High School, Middle School

    Simulation: Ionic & Covalent Bonding Mark as Favorite (152 Favorites)

    In the September 2016 simulation, students investigate both ionic and covalent bonding. Students will have the opportunity to interact with many possible combinations of atoms and will be tasked with determining the type of bond and the number of atom needed to form each. Students will become familiar with the molecular formula, as well as the naming system for each type of bond and geometric shape, when applicable.

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Subtopics: Molecular Geometry

Grade Level: Middle School

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