Animations


Each animation in this series can be used to help students make connections between macroscopic observations and the particulate phenomena that explain them. To view an Animation, click the Animation’s title.

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  • Atoms animation listimage april2022

    Animation

    Atoms: The Building Blocks of Matter Animation

    In this animation, students will be introduced to the idea that everything is made of atoms, and that since atoms are so extremely small, even small objects contain vast numbers of atoms. They will see several examples to illustrate this point. Then they will be given a brief overview of the evolution of how people thought about atoms from the ancient Greeks through Dalton.

  • Ph scale animation thumbnail

    Animation

    The pH Scale Animation

    In this activity, students will be introduced to the fundamentals of the pH scale and how it is used to distinguish between acids and bases. They will be shown everyday examples of acids and bases and where they fall on the pH scale. The logarithmic nature of the pH scale is explained, and universal indicator is introduced as a way of identifying the pH of a substance. There is also a brief overview of the chemistry of acids and bases.

  • Classifying chemical rxn thumbnail v1

    Animation

    Classifying Chemical Reactions Animation

    In this animation, students will learn about some of the ways to classify different types of chemical reactions. It covers synthesis (combination), decomposition, single replacement (single displacement), double replacement (double displacement), combustion, and acid-base neutralization reactions.

  • Em spectrum sim listimage

    Animation

    The Electromagnetic Spectrum Animation

    In this animation, students will learn about the electromagnetic spectrum, with a focus on the visible spectrum. It addresses the relationship between color, wavelength, frequency, and energy of light waves, as well as how an object absorbs and reflects certain wavelengths of light to contribute to the color we perceive.

  • Classifying matter animation thumbnail

    Animation

    Classifying Matter Animation

    In this animation, students will become familiar with definitions and examples of several broad classifications of matter, including pure substances (elements and compounds) and mixtures (homogeneous and heterogeneous). Students will be given real-life examples as well as particle diagrams. **This video has no audio**

  • Screenshot measurment animation

    Animation

    Measurement Animation

    In this animation, students review the fundamentals of measurement in length, mass, and volume. The animation also provides opportunities for students to practice unit conversions to confirm their understanding. **This video has no audio**

  • Solubility

    Animation

    Solubility Animation

    In an animation, students will have an opportunity to visualize on the particulate level how solubility works. Examples of ionic compounds and a polar covalent compound show how when water is attracted to charged parts, they dissolve, and when they're not attracted to charged parts they stay solid. **This video has no audio**

  • Atomic & ionic radii

    Animation

    Atomic & Ionic Radii Animation

    In this animation, students will have an opportunity to visualize atomic and ionic radii. They will look at the different sizes of atoms in the third period and the atoms in the sixth group. They will also look at an atom and its cation as well as an atom and its anion. **This video has no audio**

  • Orbitals

    Animation

    Orbitals Animation

    In this animation, students will visualize how orbitals are superimposed upon one another within an atom, in three dimensions. The orbitals depicted in this animation are 1s, 2s, 2p, 3s, 3p, 4s, and 3d. **This video has no audio**

  • Net ionic equations

    Animation

    Net Ionic Equations Animation

    In this animation, students will witness a precipitate reaction on the particulate level to understand why a net ionic equation represents what happens in these reaction types. An example of diluting a soluble solid, mixing two aqueous reactants that yield aqueous products, and mixing two aqueous reactants that yield a precipitate are part of this animation. **This video has no audio**

  • Limiting reactant

    Animation

    Limiting Reactant Animation

    In this animation, students will visualize on the particulate level what happens in a limiting reactant problem. A number of limiting reactant scenarios are animated, including a simple example of how to build a bike to introduce the concept of limiting reactant. Conservation of mass is also demonstrated by calculating masses from the mole quantities of the reactants and products. **This video has no audio**

  • Equilibrium animation thumbnail

    Animation

    Equilibrium Animation

    In this animation, students will visualize equilibrium with the help of water and a piece of chalk (calcium carbonate). **This video has no audio**

  • Density

    Animation

    Density Animation

    In this animation, students will visualize density on the particulate level. There are opportunities to make qualitative and quantitative comparisons between substances. **This video has no audio**

  • Bonding animation thumbnail

    Animation

    Bonding Animation

    In this animation, students will visualize how different chemical bonds form. Examples of ionic, covalent, and polar covalent bonds are animated, and then students are given a sample of compounds to predict the bonding types. **This video has no audio**

  • Gases

    Animation

    Gases Animation

    In this animation, students will visualize how the quantity, volume, temperature, and pressure of a gas are related. This is done qualitatively through the balloon and bell jar scenarios. Quantitative relationships, with the corresponding laws, are summarized at the end. **This video has no audio**

  • Galvanic cell

    Animation

    Galvanic Cell Animation

    In this animation, students will visualize electrons traveling through a galvanic cell. Copper and zinc are the chemicals depicted in the spontaneous reaction and the importance of the salt bridge is highlighted. **This video has no audio**