Mysteriously Melodramatic & Maniacal Metric Measurements (17 Favorites)

ACTIVITY in Measurements, SI Units. Last updated July 30, 2018.


Summary

In this activity, students predict the measurements of objects using metric units. They then take the actual measurements and compare them to their predictions.

Grade Level

High school

Objectives

By the end of this lesson, students should be able to

  • Take measurements using metric units.

Chemistry Topics

This lesson supports students’ understanding of

  • Measurements
  • SI units

Time

Teacher Preparation: 20 minutes

Lesson: 1 hour

Materials

  • Meter stick
  • Thermometer
  • Graduated cylinder
  • Large beaker

Safety

  • While outside, must remain in view of your teacher at all times.
  • Do not approach any parked or moving vehicles.

Teacher Notes

  • This activity works well as a competition, assigning points for teams based on how closely their predictions match actual measurements.
  • If using the activity as a competition, make sure rules for scoring are made clear before beginning the activity.
  • Students may have difficulty figuring out how to measure the volume of a hand, particularly if this activity is used at the beginning of the school year. It may be helpful to have a discussion about volume measurements prior to the activity.

For the Student

Lesson

Safety

  • While outside, you must remain in view of your teacher at all times. You may not approach any parked or moving vehicles.

Materials

  • Meter stick
  • Thermometer
  • Graduated cylinder
  • Large beaker

Procedure

PART I: MAKING PREDICTIONS

For each of the following items, make a prediction for the measurement of the item using the unit given. You must write your answers in PEN. You may not cross out an answer or change it at any time. You will have 3 minutes to make your predictions.

1. The length of the building in meters: __________________

2. The height of the exteriors doors in decameters: ________________

3. The height of an exterior step in millimeters: ________________

4. The temperature outside, in the shade, in Kelvin: ______________

5. The volume of water a solo cup can hold in milliliters: _____________

6. The area of a parking space in square meters: ________________

7. The area of the building in square meters: ______________

8. The height of the building in meters: ______________

9. The volume of the building in cubic meters: ______________

10. The volume of your smallest groupmate’s hand in milliliters: ____________

11. The temperature of your groupmate’s armpit in Celsius: ____________

PART II: MAKING MEASUREMENTS

Take a meter stick, a thermometer, graduated cylinder and this handout with you. Measure each of the items and record the measurement in the correct units. You must record your answers in pen. You may not cross out an answer or change it at any time. You will have 25 minutes to make your measurements. Any items you have not made a measurement for will cost you points in the game.

1. The length of the building in meters: __________________

2. The height of the exteriors doors in decameters: ________________

3. The height of an exterior step in millimeters: ________________

4. The temperature outside, in the shade, in Kelvin: ______________

5. The volume of water a solo cup can hold in milliliters: _____________

6. The area of a parking space in square meters: ________________

7. The area of the building in square meters: ______________

8. The height of the building in meters: ______________

9. The volume of the building in cubic meters: ______________

10. The volume of your smallest groupmate’s hand in milliliters: ____________

11. The temperature of your groupmate’s armpit in Celsius: ____________

Conclusions

How close were your predictions to the actual measurements?

Do you think you would have been closer if you were using English measurements (foot, yard, Fahrenheit)? EXPLAIN YOUR ANSWER.