Classroom Resources: Solutions


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26 – 50 of 132 Classroom Resources

  • Reduction, Redox Reaction, Reduction Potentials, Galvanic Cells, Oxidation, Half Reactions, Cathode, Anode, Electron Transfer, Electrons, Concentration, Molarity, Net Ionic Equation, Nernst Equation | High School

    Simulation: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells 2 Mark as Favorite (32 Favorites)

    In this simulation, students can create a variety of standard and non-standard condition galvanic/voltaic cells. Students will choose the metal and solution for each half cell, as well as the concentration of those solutions. They can build concentration cells and other non-standard cells, record the cell potential from the voltmeter, and observe the corresponding oxidation and reduction half reactions.

  • Concentration, Percent Composition | Middle School, High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Lab: Homemade Hydrometers Mark as Favorite (4 Favorites)

    In this lesson, students will engineer simple hydrometers from straws and clay to learn about standard solutions, calibration, and instrument drift. They will use their hydrometers to test the salinity of samples of natural water.

  • Galvanic Cells, Reduction Potentials, Redox Reaction, Half Reactions, Electrons, Electron Transfer, Anode, Cathode, Oxidation, Reduction, Concentration, Net Ionic Equation, Molarity, Nernst Equation | High School

    Activity: Simulation Activity: Non-Standard Galvanic Cells Mark as Favorite (8 Favorites)

    In this activity, students will use a simulation to create a variety of non-standard condition galvanic/voltaic cells. This simulation allows students to choose the metal and solution for each half cell, as well as the concentration of those solutions. Students will build concentration cells and other non-standard cells and record the cell potential from the voltmeter. They will compare the results of different data sets, write net ionic equations, and describe electron flow through a galvanic/voltaic cell from anode to cathode as well as the direction of migration of ions, anions towards the anode and cations towards the cathode.

  • Solubility, Conductivity, Concentration, Equilibrium Constants, Stoichiometry | High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Lab: Experimental Determination of the Solubility Product Constant for Calcium Hydroxide Mark as Favorite (12 Favorites)

    In this lab, students will predict and measure the relationship between the conductivity of a solution of calcium hydroxide and the mass of substance added to it. From the relationship, students will determine solubility and Ksp of calcium hydroxide. Ksp will be calculated using the molar concentration of ions in the solution and the equilibrium expression for the dissociation of calcium hydroxide.

  • Significant Figures, Measurements, Beer's Law, Concentration, Molarity | High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Lab: Investigating Shades of Blue Mark as Favorite (11 Favorites)

    In this lab investigation, students will create a copper(II) nitrate solution. Each group will be given a different measurement device in order to see how the accuracy of the preparation of the solution is affected by the limitations of the measurement device. The goal is for students to have a true understanding of why significant figures are important.

  • Solubility, Solute & Solvent, Precipitate, Mixtures, Error Analysis, Chemical Change, Physical Change, Observations, Identifying an Unknown, Graphing | Middle School, High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Lab: Chemicals, Chromatography, and Crime! Mark as Favorite (35 Favorites)

    In this lab, students will test “evidence” that has been collected from a crime scene. In order to determine if the victim was poisoned, students will perform a solubility and crystallization test on an unknown powder. Then, students will attempt to identify the culprit by using paper chromatography to analyze the lipstick from the potential criminals.

  • Galvanic Cells, Redox Reaction, Reduction Potentials, Half Reactions, Cathode, Anode, Oxidation, Reduction, Electrons, Electron Transfer, Net Ionic Equation | High School

    Simulation: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells Mark as Favorite (61 Favorites)

    In this simulation, students select different metals and aqueous solutions to build a galvanic/voltaic cell that generates electrical energy and observe the corresponding oxidation and reduction half reactions.

  • Galvanic Cells, Reduction Potentials, Redox Reaction, Half Reactions, Cathode, Anode, Oxidation, Reduction, Electrons, Electron Transfer, Net Ionic Equation | High School

    Activity: Simulation Activity: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells Mark as Favorite (31 Favorites)

    In this activity, students will use a simulation to create a variety of galvanic/voltaic cells with different electrodes. They will record the cell potential from the voltmeter and will use their data to determine the reduction potential of each half reaction. Students will also identify anodes and cathodes, write half reaction equations and full chemical equations, and view what is happening in each half cell and the salt bridge on a molecular scale.

  • Review, Culminating Project, Mixtures, Separating Mixtures, Beer's Law, Concentration, Redox Reaction, Half Reactions, pH, Titrations, Buffers, Indicators, Ionic Bonding, Covalent Bonding, Alloys, Percent Composition, Le Châtelier's Principle, Enthalpy, Calorimetry, Conductivity | High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Lesson Plan: AP Chemistry Experimental Evidence Review Mark as Favorite (31 Favorites)

    In this lesson, students will evaluate data from 16 simulated lab experiments that were designed to mirror the Recommended Labs from the College Board. Corresponding lab experiments and demonstration options have also been included for teacher reference.

  • Equilibrium Constants, Le Châtelier's Principle, Gibb's Free Energy , Enthalpy, Entropy, Solubility | High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Lesson Plan: Relationship Between Free Energy and the Equilibrium Constant Mark as Favorite (14 Favorites)

    In this lesson, students will explore the relationships between solubility and Keq (specifically Ksp), as well as Keq and ΔG°. First, a guided inquiry activity will introduce the relationship between standard free energy and equilibrium constant with the equation ΔG° = -RTlnKeq. Then data collection regarding solubility of potassium nitrate at various temperatures will lead to the calculation of Ksp and ΔGo for the dissolution reaction at those temperatures. Students will manipulate the equations ΔG° = -RTlnKeq and ΔG° = ΔH° - TΔS° to derive a linear relationship between 1/T and lnKeq, which will then be graphed to determine values for ΔH° and ΔS°.

  • Solubility, Intermolecular Forces, Molarity | High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Activity: Solutions Escape Room Mark as Favorite (73 Favorites)

    In this activity, students will review concepts covered in a solutions unit. They will complete problems in order to determine codes that will allow them to advance through stages of a Google Form, which is set up as an escape room. This activity is designed to be used at the end of a unit, or as an alternate to an exam, particularly in a virtual environment.

  • Concentration, Graphing, Electromagnetic Spectrum | High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Lesson Plan: Determining the Time of Death Mark as Favorite (32 Favorites)

    In this lesson, students will perform a flame test on a sample of vitreous humor (liquid found in the eyeball) in a forensic investigation. They will determine which element from the sample is used to determine the time of death. Then they will engineer a simple spectrophotometer to quantify that element. Evaluating a fake sample of vitreous humor in their spectrophotometer will help them determine the time of death for a hypothetical cadaver.

  • Titrations, Acid Base Reactions, Identifying an Unknown, Molarity | High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Lesson Plan: Investigating a Suspicious Drowning with Titrations Mark as Favorite (48 Favorites)

    In this lesson, students take on the role of a forensic chemist who is tasked with investigating a suspicious drowning incident. Students will conduct a series of titrations on an evidence sample of water collected from the victim's lungs as well as on several water samples from local water sources (lakes, rivers, wells, etc.) Based on their findings, they will determine where the victim actually drowned.

  • Solubility, Intermolecular Forces, Mixtures, Separating Mixtures | High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Lab: Using Paper Chromatography to Separate the Pigments Found in Ink Mark as Favorite (25 Favorites)

    In this lab, students will separate the component pigments of a water-soluble black marker using paper chromatography.

  • Physical Properties, Covalent Bonding, Electronegativity, Polarity, Molecular Geometry, Intermolecular Forces, Solubility | Middle School, High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Activity: The Chemistry of Water Video Questions Mark as Favorite (40 Favorites)

    In this lesson, students will watch a video and answer questions about how the molecular geometry and polarity of water give rise to many of its unusual physical properties, including its relatively high boiling point and its ability to dissolve some substances but not others.

  • Ionic Bonding, Naming Compounds, Molecular Formula, Ions, Ionic Radius, Solubility, Melting Point, Physical Properties | High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Activity: My Name is Bond, Ionic Bond Mark as Favorite (63 Favorites)

    In this lesson, students will demonstrate their knowledge of ionic bond strength using a “brackets” activity. Pairs of students start the activity playing a game of “Ionic Compound War” to build eight compounds. Then then transfer the compounds to a “bracket” and use their knowledge of ionic bonding, along with a solubility chart, to predict the strongest and weakest bond between four pairs of ionic substances.

  • Ionic Bonding, Naming Compounds, Molecular Formula, Ions, Ionic Radius, Solubility, Melting Point, Physical Properties | High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Activity: Ionic Bonding Brackets Mark as Favorite (50 Favorites)

    In this lesson, students will demonstrate their knowledge of ionic bond strength and its relationship to the properties of melting point and solubility using a “brackets” activity. After analyzing the ionic charge and radius to predict the strongest and weakest bond between four pairs of ionic substances, they will then determine which will be the least soluble.

  • Electromagnetic Spectrum, Molecular Structure, Mixtures | Middle School, High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Activity: What are Pigments? Video Questions Mark as Favorite (5 Favorites)

    In this activity, students will watch a video and answer related questions about the chemistry of pigment molecules and how they are used to give paints their specific color. During the video, students will learn about the importance of a pigment’s molecular structure, how they are physically suspended to create a paint color, as well as how they interact with light.

  • Mixtures, Solute & Solvent, Intermolecular Forces, Intermolecular Forces, Molecular Structure, Polymers, Electromagnetic Spectrum | Middle School, High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Activity: What is Paint? Video Questions Mark as Favorite (10 Favorites)

    In this activity, students will watch a video and answer related questions about the composition of paint. During the video, students will learn about the differences between three common paint types, water colors, oil-based and acrylic paint as well as the chemistry of each.

  • Concentration, Solute & Solvent | Middle School, High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Lesson Plan: Diffusion and Osmosis Mark as Favorite (2 Favorites)

    In this lesson, students will build upon their understanding of solutions and concentration. They will observe the diffusion of food coloring dye in water and then perform an experiment focused on how solutions of different concentrations will affect the movement of water across a semi-permeable membrane.

  • Mixtures | Middle School, High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Lesson Plan: Making Sense of Milk Mark as Favorite (16 Favorites)

    In this lesson, students will compare and contrast the chemical compositions of different types of plant milk and animal milk by analyzing data and developing models.

  • Molarity, Concentration, Solute & Solvent | High School

    Simulation: Preparing Solutions Mark as Favorite (72 Favorites)

    In this simulation, students will complete a calculation in order to determine either the molarity of solution, volume of solution, or mass of solute needed. Additionally the associated particle diagram for the solution will be displayed to help students better visualize the solution at the particulate level. Finally, students will gain familiarity with the proper lab techniques for preparing a solution as they are lead through a step-by-step animated process demonstrating this procedure.

  • Molarity, Concentration, Solute & Solvent | High School

    Activity: Simulation Activity: Preparing Solutions Mark as Favorite (30 Favorites)

    In this simulation, students will complete a calculation in order to determine the value of an unknown variable related to a described solution and then they will observe an animation of the solution being prepared. The calculation will require the student to determine either the molarity of solution, volume of solution, or mass of solute needed. Additionally the associated particle diagram for the solution will be displayed to help students better visualize the solution at the particulate level. Finally, students will gain familiarity with the proper lab techniques for preparing a solution as they are lead through a step-by-step animated process demonstrating this procedure. The simulation is designed as a five question quiz for students to use multiple times.

  • Balancing Equations, Classification of Reactions, Chemical Change, Identifying an Unknown, Molarity, Concentration | High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Lab: An Environmental Impact Study Mark as Favorite (74 Favorites)

    In this lab, students will test a water sample which comes from a local zoo, where, it is reported that many bird eggs are not hatching. Students will test the water for the presence of multiple ions. Once the type of ion in the water is determined, students will write balanced equations to illustrate their findings. Students will also conduct a serial dilution to determine the concentration, or molarity, of the ion in the water sample. This molarity will be compared to known values to determine if the materials in the water are at an unhealthy level.

  • Density, Concentration, Solute & Solvent | High School

    Access is an AACT member benefit. Lab: Test Tube Challenge Mark as Favorite (42 Favorites)

    In this lab, students will be challenged to create a density column, consisting of three distinct layers of sugar-water solution. This is an inquiry lab, where the students must apply their understanding of density and concentration in order to devise a successful plan for creating the column correctly.

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