Classroom Resources: Molecules & Bonding


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51 – 75 of 137 Classroom Resources

  • Mixtures, Molecular Structure, Electromagnetic Spectrum | High School, Middle School

    Video: What are Pigments? Video

    This video discusses the chemistry of pigment molecules and how they are used to give paints their specific color. Students will learn about the importance of a pigment’s molecular structure, how they are physically suspended to create a paint color, as well as how they interact with light.

  • Mixtures, Intermolecular Forces, Molecular Formula, Polymers, Molecular Structure, Solute & Solvent, Intermolecular Forces, Electromagnetic Spectrum | High School, Middle School

    Video: What is Paint? Video

    This video investigates the composition of paint, while analyzing the fundamental chemistry principles of its main components. Students will learn about the differences between three common paint types, water colors, oil-based and acrylic paint as well as the chemistry of each.

  • Elements, History, Periodic Table, Covalent Bonding, Ionic Bonding, Atomic Mass, Subatomic Particles | High School, Middle School

    Project: Exploring Elements

    In this project, students will select an element and then use Ptable.com to explore aspects of the element including its periodicity, electron configuration, history, and uses in industry.

  • Polarity, Periodic Table, Molecular Structure, VSEPR Theory, Electronegativity | High School

    Activity: Making Connections between Electronegativity, Molecular Shape, and Polarity

    In this activity, students will find the electronegativity values of a variety of elements, draw the Lewis structures of select molecules that are made with those elements, and identify the molecular shape of each molecule. Students will then be asked to determine if the molecules are polar or nonpolar based on the electronegativity values of the atoms and the molecular shape. Students will use Ptable.com to find information about atoms and molecules and connect what they find to observable properties.

  • Electricity, Electrostatic Forces, Metallic Bonding, Electrons | High School

    Demonstration: Metallic Bonding & Magnetics

    In this demonstration students will observe how electrons flow through a metal in an example of metallic bonding. Using tubes made of different metal materials as well as one made of plastic, in combination with a rare earth magnet (neodymium magnet) the teacher will demonstrate how electrons will flow freely through a metal and create a magnetic field.

  • Physical Properties, Phase Changes, Polymers | Middle School

    Lab: Changing a Monomer to a Polymer!

    In this lab, students will have the opportunity to see the complexity of the different phases of matter. This lab will allow students to investigate polymers and physical properties, while connecting these concepts to the phases of matter. Students will also better understand that some substances are not easily identified as a particular phase of matter and that some substances can have characteristics of more than one phase of matter.

  • Observations, Physical Properties, Mixtures, Polarity | Elementary School

    Demonstration: Colorful Milk

    In this demonstration, students will observe as the teacher creates several colorful mixtures. Using food coloring, water and milk, students will watch the colors swirl and mix. Students will have the opportunity to make a prediction about what will happen to the colors when a sample of soap is introduced to the mixture.

  • Molecular Formula, Balancing Equations, Conservation of Mass | High School, Middle School

    Lesson Plan: Counting Atoms & Balancing Equations

    In this lesson, students will learn how to count atoms and how to balance chemical equations using videos, simulations and games.

  • Melting Point, Covalent Bonding, Ionic Bonding, Molecular Structure | High School

    Lab: Ionic vs. Covalent Compounds

    In this lab, students will compare two seemingly similar substances, salt and sugar. Through melting a sample of each substance and analyze of their chemical composition, students will draw conclusions regarding ionic and covalent compounds.

  • Solubility, Molecular Structure, Buffers | High School

    Lab: Aspirin Tablets: Are they all the Same?

    In this lab, students will design an experiment to test the time and completeness of dissolution of various types of aspirin in different pH environments.

  • Elements, Molecular Formula, Model of the Atom, Subatomic Particles | Middle School

    Project: What's It Made Of?

    In this project each student will conduct research to discover what compounds, molecules, and elements make up a basic everyday object of their choice. The student will create a poster detailing what the object is made of, including a Bohr model. The student will also create a question about their object’s atomic structure for their peers as part of a culminating project gallery walk to observe, discuss, and learn about each poster.

  • Molecular Structure, Chemical Change | Middle School

    Lab: Detecting Fats and Starches in Food

    In this lab, students will identify fats and starches in a variety of foods. Since we eat many complex foods which contain mixtures of carbohydrates (e.g. sugars and starches), fats, and proteins, conducting food tests will enable the students to determine the make up of a certain food.

  • Naming Compounds, Molecular Formula, Covalent Bonding, Lewis Structures | High School

    Activity: Molecular Compound Dice

    In this activity students will use dice and element cards to name molecular compounds and draw their Lewis dot structures.

  • Naming Compounds, Molecular Formula, Covalent Bonding, Ionic Bonding, Stoichiometry, Classification of Reactions, Limiting Reactant | High School

    Activity: Isn't it Ionic

    In this activity students will form ionic compounds and covalent compounds using clues and questions. Students are going to then develop their own stoichiometric problems and have other groups attempt to solve it.

  • Ionic Bonding, Net Ionic Equation | High School

    Lab: The pH of Salts

    In this lab, students will determine whether an aqueous solution is acidic, basic, or neutral. Students will write net ionic equations for the hydrolysis of a solution.

  • Physical Properties, Covalent Bonding, Ionic Bonding | High School

    Lab: You Light Up My Life!

    In this lab, students will participate in a guided inquiry in which they will test different physical properties, such as conductivity and solubility of given samples. This lab can be used to introduce ionic, covalent and metallic bonds as well as their properties. This lab should help students make connections between the types of bonds, differentiate between them, as well as help to better understand the nomenclature of ionic and covalent compounds.

  • Naming Compounds, Ionic Bonding, Lewis Structures | High School, Middle School

    Activity: Ionic Bonding Puzzle

    In this activity, students match puzzle pieces to create neutral ionic compounds. Once they have made a neutral ionic compound they can use electron dot diagrams to show the formation of the compounds. Finally they will name the ionic compounds.

  • Physical Properties, Polarity, Molecular Structure | High School

    Activity: What Makes Water So Special?

    In this activity, students will become familiar with the special properties of water by completing several activities that investigate the following physical properties: cohesion, adhesion, surface tension, and capillary action.

  • Naming Compounds, Introduction, Interdisciplinary, Molecular Formula, Molecular Structure, Molecular Structure , Chemical Bond | High School, Middle School

    Activity: Modeling Carbohydrates

    In this activity, students will identify that organic compounds contain carbon and other elements such as hydrogen and oxygen. They will investigate the structure of different organic and inorganic compounds and model several molecules, including a carbohydrate molecule. They will use their models to help understand how larger molecules are broken down into smaller molecules.

  • Phase Changes, Conservation of Matter, Polymers, Chemical Change | Elementary School

    Lesson Plan: Making Slime

    In this lesson, students explore the science behind chemical reactions as well as the processes used by chemical engineering principles to develop new materials. The idea that mixing two substances can result in an explosion, the release of gas, and the formation of an entirely new substance is both fascinating and mysterious to most young students.

  • Periodic Table, Covalent Bonding, Ionic Bonding, Electron Configuration, Atomic Radius, Electrons, Orbitals | High School

    Activity: Planet P-10

    In this activity, students will create a periodic table using orbital rules from a planet called P-10 and identify periodic trends and bonding rules.

  • Physical Properties, Molecular Formula, History, Covalent Bonding, Molecular Structure, Chemical Properties | High School

    Activity: Molecule of the Week

    In this activity, students research and present a molecule they find relevant to real life, either in the past or present. They must submit notes to the teacher the day before they present their findings in five to 10 minutes to their chemistry class.

  • Mixtures, Solubility, Intermolecular Forces, Polarity, Solute & Solvent, Intermolecular Forces, Molecular Geometry | High School, Middle School, Elementary School

    Animation: Solubility Animation

    In an animation, students will have an opportunity to visualize on the particulate level how solubility works. Examples of ionic compounds and a polar covalent compound show how when water is attracted to charged parts, they dissolve, and when they're not attracted to charged parts they stay solid. **This video has no audio**

  • History, Periodic Table, Molecular Structure, Molecular Structure , Molecular Geometry | High School, Middle School, Elementary School

    Video: Phosphorous Video

    In this video, Sam Kean tells the story of how phosphorus was at the center of the race to discover the structure of DNA.

  • Polarity, Molecular Formula, Covalent Bonding, Ionic Bonding | High School, Middle School, Elementary School

    Animation: Bonding Animation

    "In this animation, students will visualize how different chemical bonds form. Examples of ionic, covalent, and polar covalent bonds are animated, and then students are given a sample of compounds to predict the bonding types. **This video has no audio**"

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